Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2019)

(2019)

With Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker, Lucasfilm brought the Star Wars sequel trilogy to an epic conclusion.

Under the direction of J.J. Abrams, who returned behind the camera for the finale after directing The Force Awakens, The Rise of Skywalker skillfully blends all the ingredients we've come to expect from Star Wars movies with moments of dread and delight and battles of good and evil.

Having contributed its team's VFX expertise to the five most recent movies from the famous franchise, as well as on the Disney + space Western series The Mandalorian, the Hybride team was super excited to learn they would be taking part in the action-packed finale to the Skywalker Saga.

In the streets of Kijimi

To recreate the snow dusted streets of the frigid mountainous planet Kijimi, production built a large set in the exterior backlot of the Pinewood studios. Initially, Hybride's mandate was to extend what had been shot and create a city based on artwork provided by ILM, mimicking everything that was on set. 

 

ILM structures and scenic details were shared with the Hybride team to build a library of assets for establishing shots and set extensions-including rooftop views of First Order walkers wading through the city. All of these elements had to be built while keeping in mind that they would be seen from many different views and distances from the camera.

IN THE STREETS OF KIJIMI
IN THE STREETS OF KIJIMI

Atmospheric elements and enhancements were simulated in order to add depth to the city that was always seen under the night sky. Chimney smoke, ice and snow effects were used in conjunction with the city lights to help sell the scale of the shots. Hybride artists animated flying ships in the distance to bring movement, then added light flickers, clouds, and colour variations throughout the city. Snow was then added on top of everything using a custom set-up in Houdini.
 

The droids are all here and so is...Hey-Heeeeyyy Babu Frik

When the Resistance fighters seek the assistance of Babu Frik, we are introduced to a tiny droidsmith working among the Spice Runners of Kijimi who has the ability to reprogram or modify virtually any droid, regardless of the security measures protecting its systems.

The suit built for the sequence where they deconstruct C-3PO in Babu's workshop didn't have any legs and only had the front half of the head, as the backside and wires needed to be completely recreated in CG. Hybride artists modified C-3PO CG assets to perfectly fit the scan of the suit used in the sequence.

 

REY AND C-3PO
REY AND C-3PO

Once the meticulous tracking and matchmove work completed, the team started to work on matching the set lighting. Using photo references taken from the set, chrome balls and HDRI's they were able to easily erase the crewmembers reflected on the suit. Hybride's artists then generated C-3PO's missing legs and the wires behind his head. Since we can see through the wires, it was very important to create clean plates so the elements could be seamlessly integrated.

 

Hybride artists then provided Babu with rod and puppeteer removal and digital eye enhancements using a few 2D tricks.

BABU FRIK
BABU FRIK

While exploring Ochi's derelict ship, BB-8 stumbled across the deactivated D-O, left alone and covered in dust. BB-8 promptly reactivated the little droid, who expressed his gratitude at being returned to life. Hybride animators articulated the animated BB-8 and D-O characters-reuniting with the beloved BB-8 that they had animated in Star Wars: The Force Awakens where he made his first appearance in the famous franchise back in 2015.

REY AND D-O
REY AND D-O


Since both droids filmed on set were practical puppets, the artists tried to keep as much of the robots as they could by erasing the puppeteers. Based on the two models provided by ILM, the droids were created entirely in CG for shots where their actions were to specific.

REY AND BB-8
REY AND BB-8

Using the Force

Kijimi set extensions are also featured in a Force Vision sequence when Kylo contacts Rey and engages her in light saber combat - Kylo on Kijimi, and Rey in a First Order sanctuary containing the remains of Darth Vader's helmet. Hybride used light sabers to wipe frames between the contrasting environments. Kijimi is dark, hazy and atmospheric, whereas the sanctuary is pure and white. 

USING THE FORCE
USING THE FORCE

As Rey fights Kylo the action begins on Kijimi, and then continues to the sanctuary where a light saber blow hits the pedestal, causing it to shatter and Vader's helmet to fall. Hybride artists precisely choreographed the CG pedestal explosion and also articulated interactions with animation, which were then matched with Kylo picking up the helmet in Kijimi.

Ahch-To baby 

Hybride also contributed VFX for the sequence where Rey flees Kef Bir in Kylo's fighter, which she then destroys on planet Ahch-to. To establish the Jedi Island, the filmmakers used aerial footage of Skellig Michael, from Episode VI. For island surface scenes, the production team built a back lot set at Pinewood.

Hybride artists extended the set by recreating part of the island that hadn't been seen in previous episodes. Using photos and various plates that were taken on the actual location, they were able to generate all set extensions through a blend of matte painting and 2.5D techniques.

 

To enhance Kylo's burning tie fighter, the live action model was used as a reference for tracking and layout. Fire and smoke elements were then were added to the actual plate to intensify what was already shot. Interactive light from the added CG fire onto the live action model was crucial in order to make the integration believable. Burn textures were generated in Mari and all of the fire simulations were created in Houdini.

 

 

AHCH-TO BABY
AHCH-TO BABY

As Rey loses herself to hopelessness and desperation, the Force ghost of her former Jedi mentor, Luke Skywalker, appears from the burning ship.

 

"The glow couldn't be too bright against daylight exteriors", noted Hybride VFX Supervisor Joseph Kasparian, "it felt like Luke didn't match the lighting in the scene. In shots of Luke against bright backgrounds it was important to maintain the feeling he was still being lit, so we made sure the edges of his glow didn't become too transparent."

Star wars: The Rise of Skywalker was Hybride's 6th incursion into the Star Wars universe and represented the studio's most important participation to the famous franchise to date. The ninth, and final film in The Skywalker Saga, truly delivered a spectacular ending in a galaxy far, far away.

Credits

The Rise of Skywalker (2019)

Released on December 20, 2019

Produced by: Lucasfilm

Director: J.J. Abrams

Overall Visual Effects Supervisor (Lucasfilm): Roger Guyett

Visual Effects Supervisor (ILM): Patrick Tubach

VFX Workload: 323 shots

Cumulative Duration: 18 minutes

Project Timeframe: 11 months (January 2019 to November 2019)

VFX Description: Design, Tracking, Layout, Lighting, Texture, Modeling, Animation, Compositing.

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LAYOUT/TRACKING

Steve Pelchat, (lead layout/tracking)

Alain Lacroix

Benoit Morin

Kanica Hang

Samuel Loriault-Goulet

Stéphane Maillet

Yassine Triki

TEXTURE & LIGHTING

Christophe Damiano, (Lead Textures & Lighting)

Julien Chabot, (Lead Textures & Lighting)

Maryse Bouchard, (Lead Textures & Lighting)

Alexandre Tessier

Antoine Goncalves

Christian Ménard

David Dambremont

Doréa Fontaine

Gabrielle Marchand

Ian Allard

Léane Morin

Marie-Claude Aubry

Mathieu Beaudoin

Myriam Ricard-Lalonde

Nicolas Leroy

Nicolas Scuntaro

Quentin Luna

Robert Buca

Samuel Jacques

Steve Fraser

Steven Quinones-Colon

Valérie Villeneuve

Vassilios Lanaris

Yanick Gaudreau

FX ANIMATORS

Danny Levesque, (Lead FX Animator)

Dang Vy Nguyen

Francis Beauregard

Jérémie Chagnon

Julien Dubusset

Luigi Duranti

Kishen PJ

Louis Desrochers

Richard Clément Tam

Stéphane Arsenault

TECHNICAL DIRECTORS

Patrick Piché, (Lead Technical Director)

Bruno-Pierre Jobin

Jimmy Caron

Mathieu Leclaire

Michel Bergeron

John Mark Gibbons

Daniel Bros

MODELERS

Marco Tremblay, (Environment Supervisor)

Miguel Berube Ouellet

Robert De La Cruz

Mathieu Lalonde

David Roberge

Matthew Smith

Philippe Vachon

Vikramjit Sorensangbam

Varun Sanjivi

DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT ARTIST

Michael Havart

ANIMATORS

Alexandre Alin

Josef Sy

Eduardo Azcue

William Campbell

Mary Yang

PRESIDENT AND HEAD OF PRODUCTION

Pierre Raymond

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Michel Murdock

PRODUCTION VICE PRESIDENT

Thierry Delattre

HEAD OF PRODUCTION MONTREAL STUDIO

Mathieu Boucher

VISUAL EFFECTS SUPERVISORS

Joseph Kasparian

François Lambert

COMPUTER GRAPHICS SUPERVISORS

Emmanuel Pelletier

Philippe Théroux

Christopher Ahrens

COMPOSITING SUPERVISORS

Michel Barrière

Olivier Beaulieu

Simon Marinof

VISUAL EFFECT PRODUCERS

Richard Martin

Louise Bertrand

Sébastien Racine

Yanick Wilisky

CREATIVE SUPERVISOR

Pierre Blain

ANIMATION SUPERVISOR

Kenneth Steel

VISUAL EFFECT COORDINATORS

Audrey Deschênes

Caitlin Howell

Catherine Lecavalier

Joanie Croteau

Karina Mariano

Leo-Partick Houde

Marc St-Gelais

Martine Losier

Yann Nicolas

RESSOURCE COORDINATOR

Sylvain Rioux

TECHNICAL SUPPORT

Karim Besbes

Mélanie Cotton

Luc Desmarais

Stephan Gervais

Olivier Painchaud

COMMUNICATIONS

Sylvie Talbot

Anne Tremblay

ADMINISTRATION

Caroline Bélisle

Marie Nakhlé

Isabelle Desrochers

DIGITAL COMPOSITORS

Maxime Lemieux, (Lead Digital Compositor)

Matthieu Chatelier, (Lead Digital Compositor)

Alice Pépujol

Alban Kasikci

Belly Mingmuong

Christopher Payne

Daniel Cregan

Éloi Brunelle

Elsa Lemire

François Leduc

Jeffrey Jin

Jérôme Foucout

Jocelyn Maher

Julie Therrien

Justin Hébert

Katy Savoie

Marc-Olivier Simoneau

Martin Lipmann

Mathieu Boudreau

Maxime Besner

Maxime Ferland

Olivier Gravel

Patrick Tassé

Robert Ozaeta

Samuel Armin Gutiérrez

Samuel Lepage-Bédard

Thomas Hallé

Véronique Guay

Véronique Tremblay

Vincent Mak

Xavier Larocque

Gabriel Couture-Bojanowski

VFX EDITORS

Guillaume St-Aubin

Sébastien Rioux

PAINT & ROTO

Juliette Compignie, (Lead Paint & Roto)

Mélissa Laframboise Maillé, (Lead Paint & Roto)

Anne Fortin

Cédric Pépin

Charles-Étienne D'Amours

Christophe Trudel

Dominique Richer

Érika Normandin

James Daniel Haines

Jeff Blouin

Marie-Eve St-Amour

Sylvain Régnié

Yannick Bissonnette

CHARACTER RIGGING

Mark Masson, (Lead Character Rigging )

Stephane Jean-Mary

I/O TECHNICIANS

Jonathan Perth

Jordan Picotte

Samuel Cardinal